Posts Tagged: European Commission


29
Aug 13

The CEO’s case for rocketing equity markets

Middle East and Korean peace in the offing

A year after writing about the unsustainability of the French economy, I found myself this August once again amidst the glory-on-earth that is inland Provence. The economy is in worse shape, even more of the profit-making elite have left the country and President Francois Hollande is beyond a blancmange.

Demand for places in the South Kensington Lycée is such that a new one is being built near Wembley football stadium. London’s gain is France’s loss.

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25
Mar 13

The London property collapse

Inflation’s soaring path and generational pain

Rather like Macbeth, me-thought I heard a voice cry ‘Sleep no more!”. Having not murdered anyone, I analysed the lack of sleep and found 6 issues keeping me awake: the collapse of the London property market, soaring interest rates, accelerating global inflation, pensioner pain, the agony of the younger generation and the Middle East bloodshed.

1. Imminent Collapse of the London property market
Over the last years an unanswerable question has been what Black Swan event would lead to a fall in central London prices. We all scrabbled away for an answer in our innermost recesses, came up with zilch and the market kept on rising.


24
Oct 11

London and Caracas: two sides of the same coin

Income inequality and the foreign conundrum

There are echoes of pre-Chavez Venezuela in the UK these days. A classic example of elite capitalism and the virtually insurmountable gap between the haves and have nots. In Caracas, the elite lived in guarded mansions in the Eastern hills of the city with bodyguards accompanying them everywhere. The benefits of decades of petroleum revenues never made it into the barrios of the Western hills of the city. President Hugo Chavez was the result.


6
Dec 10

Spanish opportunities

Regulatory tales from Switzerland and the EU

Sitting to the right of Mexican Commerce Secretary Herminio Blanco Mendoza at the World Economic Forum in Davos in 1995 was like being present at a wake where thoughts of the deceased shadowed all conversation.

The tequila crisis, based around the sudden devaluation of the Mexican peso in December 1994, meant that the usually overrun Mexican evening party consisted of only one table, with a lowly journalist in the seat of honour next to the host. Mexico was going nowhere in the eyes of an international community which shuns failure.
In this subdued atmosphere, Herminio kow-towed to the unknown Indian on my right, who owned the country´s third biggest steel producer. The firm was reportedly the largest foreign currency earner in Mexico.